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User_Name: Uno Hoo
Date: Wednesday July 29, 2015
Time: 12:17 AM

Messages

Yer like a lil bitch -- all about you -- your drama -- and self important idiocy. Yer nothing but a hood rat


User_Name: garf
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 09:29 PM

Messages

I believe you Stan and I have only been to the Nass twice one year ok the other was a dry poor year for there. I have actually packed out 73 lbs myself about five years ago and that was from a 5 hr pick and it was way south of the nass. 50 lbs of that was buttons. I was in the Harper when I was Nass picking and the mushrooms were heavy and actually hiding pretty good ..some were down pretty deep . big honkers completely buried . Been to lots of areas where I can pick lots but I high grade more now and don't usually pack more than 40 lbs..some areas I have to as I will only go once to really steep and particularly torturous areas to get to.. love it and will keep on doing it til I can't ... people will believe what they want ...if you have any pictures would love to see them ....


User_Name: Stan
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 07:17 PM

Messages

I'm lucky if I get one week a year in now.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 06:31 PM

Messages

Stan, I tried hard core picking for awhile. Couldn't handle the lack of sleep and the wear and tear on the body. Guess you could say I was a wimp!
 
At 65, I still make it out to pick about 5 days a week during the season. There short days though, only 2 to 4 hours. Don't have to go anywhere though. I can walk to the patches in 5 minutes.
 
Your right about the memories. Don't remember what happened to the money made, but do remember the fun and memories making it.
 
Matsiman
 

User_Name: Stan
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 05:34 PM

Messages

Things went down hill when the big guys had to register and pay taxes to the government. I really believe that was the major decline. The money they used to pay to the picker now goes to the government and then you have changing social and economic times ect. Throw them all together and we've got what we have today. Times do change. But that's ok they always do. Just roll with it. Money aside I got way more out of those days with my family and friends and good memories! You can't put a price on that. Peace


User_Name: Stan
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 05:27 PM

Messages

Right on! Let me tell you we were a crazy bunch lol walking to the patch in the dark and hopefully getting out before it got dark. By the time you clean them and sell them and make dinner ext bed was late to say the least. At the end of the season we'd pile up in bed for two week and order out we were so worn out lol. Good times


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 05:07 PM

Messages

Stan, No need to apologize. We have trolls this time of year that wait to attack anybody.  I'm usually the target. Just ignore and don't respond to them. I'll delete those types of messages as soon as possible.
 
Thanks for your insight of how things were long ago. Some just don't believe it was possible, but as you said, it was done by those with dedication. I think I have photos on one of the galleries of 1 day picks you describe. Those photos were sent by people picking in Canada.
 
Good hunting this season, Matsiman
 

User_Name: Stan
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 04:54 PM

Messages

Hey matsi man sorry, I didn't think I had posted anything wrong I didn't make any vulgar comments, nor was I trying to incite any arguments. First time on the site and was told to go f myself. Caught me of guard I guess, I did apologize. Anyhow sorry again was not my intent to draw that kind of response.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 03:42 PM

Messages

New Visitors, Every year about this time we have trolls who post inappropriate messages. Please do not respond to these posts. I will delete them as soon as possible. Matsiman


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 12:00 PM

Messages

If you can't be respectful, don't post. Zero tolerance for posts demeaning or sarcastic remarks about others posting this season. Matsiman


User_Name: Lyle
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 11:59 AM

Messages

 Hey dudes it was down in the 30's in chemult last nite............drum roll please..................


User_Name: Scruff
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 10:58 AM

Messages

Anyone remember the Fall of 97 in the PNW? That's what we are in for. Any buyers care to post some stats for the year? California might be good.


User_Name: Stan
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 10:41 AM

Messages

I'm not telling a tall tale no reason for me to do that. Canada has some big woods and I worked with forestry for a lot of years so you can imagine the spots I came across. Old open canopy forests pure sand soil with rapid draining ect. When I look back on those years they don't get better or bigger but the memories do get fonder. I'm not trying to impress anybody I'm just stating facts about the good years I've had. Years ago at the Nass river crossing before roads it was not uncommon for 2 guys to pick a few hundred pounds and those of u guys out their who were their will undoubtedly agree. Does anybody remember 2004!


User_Name: some picker
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 10:33 AM

Messages

getting old is a lot harder than picking a bunch of mushrooms, doing both deserves respect.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 09:56 AM

Messages

Morning All, Interesting peaceful debate on the "Good Old Days".
 
I can remember days when what Stan is saying happened for a few. I personally never came close to that kind of volume. My wife and I had exclusive picking areas in those days so we didn't venture far from those areas. I did a 14 year study for pounds picked and money made on 400 acre near Cave Junction. It started in 1992 and ended in 2005. Yearly numbers can be found at this link. http://matsiman.com/boswellbioeco92-2005.htm
 
I did know a handful of pickers who did as good as Stan described. They spent 6 months doing nothing else. They were on the go 18 to 20 hours a day. If they weren't picking they were driving back and forth from patch to buyer. Not the kind of life for me.
 
Probably couldn't do that today, but who knows. Might still be a handful who do very well.
 
Matsiman

User_Name: Dreads
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 09:26 AM

Messages

Roger that hit the nail on the head when he said beware of tall tales from old dudes! My dad was an ecpert mushroom hunter back in the day, and is still ok. When he thinks of his younger days he speaks fondly of them to anybody willing to listen, for the most part. He isn't bitter nasty or unpleasant and I think it's because he understands the cycle of life. All life on earth. He doesn't see himself or his generation as particularly special or entitled, so he's broad minded and can move freely among all kinds of different people and of different ages. I like that about him, he's not like most of his generation. ;)


User_Name: garf
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 01:08 AM

Messages

the old days are gone for the really high prices I would think. That being said a guy can still make a decent dollar for hard work and using due dillegence when and who you sell to ... Last year my prices varied from 8 to 20 for 1s maybe I did get 25 one or two days ,, I am looking at a slip and it was for October an I got 22.29 lbs of 1s @12 12.54 2s @7 24.98 3s @ 6 29.85 4s @ 4 and 31.66 5s@ 2 .... me and my bro for a long day...I am not a spring chicken and he is older than me and it was a Billy Goat show which equates to no other pickers ...we packed out the lower grades because they were nice and white and knew we would get paid ..worth it yes ...fun yes ...hard work totally .. when I can get 6 for threes its fine by me and I sometimes get ten ,,nothing like when i could get 30 for 3s and 90 for ones but as I recall whenever there were Lots of mushrooms the price quickly dropped to thirty anyhow ....just my thoughts and I've done it for a long time ... this season will be just more nice fall hikes and hopefully a few good mushroom days ... and the fresh air and free feeling I get from hiking in these wonderful mountains....


User_Name: Stan
Date: Tuesday July 28, 2015
Time: 12:59 AM

Messages

Thanks for the comment, I rest my case


User_Name: udaho
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 11:32 PM

Messages

150#/day? That's some good smokin


User_Name: Stan
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 10:58 PM

Messages

No typo


User_Name: Stan
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 10:54 PM

Messages

Actually Sheila more like 200 pounds a day for 3 of us in a 6 hour pick in a bumper year. Like I said its work, long days no sleeping in. But you can believe what u want, that's ok with me though. I'm afraid the generation after me just doesn't have what it takes. It seems to me on this site which I like people spend more time complaining and talking and not doing. To be successful at a job one needs to come to work prepared and willing to do what is required . Their are some spectacular patches out in our woods but u have to go the distance. Nobody's gonna do it for you.


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 07:13 PM

Messages

That's great Sheila except I don't know if Idaho is any good for chanties? Most of the fall crop comes from the costal areas and inland a little but not that far inland I don't thik. On another note I want to mention something else about the pines - If the companies are selling to the domestic market for say 20 then the field buyer is probably paying around 5 or 6. A waste of your time to pick....... UNLESS.....You have customers to sell to direct and they will pay maybe like 15ish...The key is you gotta go get your own customers, chefs most often, and I have found they really appreciate it!


User_Name: Sheila
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 10:49 AM

Messages

Hey dudes Idaho has gotten tons of rain recently if anybody cares! typo stan? im giving you the benefit of the doubt or whatever since it's pretty ridiculous, over 150 lbs a day that is.


User_Name: Pete
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 09:45 AM

Messages

Ah yes the good ol days of the 90's. And the farther away they get the bigger and better they were! Truth be told the big money era was a very short period of time really, we just remember it the way we like best ;)


User_Name: Stan
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 08:59 AM

Messages

I've been picking 25 years now. And I'm a poundage picker , most buyers know us and what we bring in. I quit picking for a living in 2004. I do it as a vacation now. I can still do $1000 days at $6 a pound if it's a whopper of a season. That being said I know what I'm doing and i have the patches that can pump them out and no traffic. If your new to this and expect to make a pile of cash think again. Good patches are remote and difficult to access and days are long and hard. Granny patches don't cut it. Travel is expensive food is expensive and if the season craps out u better have money to get home. I've seen some desperate people over the years. Not good. Prices are to unpredictable so your taking a big risk, but each to their own. I don't complain about prices anymore it is what it is. And if I don't like it I go home.


User_Name: shroomkid
Date: Monday July 27, 2015
Time: 12:12 AM

Messages

You nailed it Dreads. The Direct-to-Customer market is the way to do it domestically. Set up your customer list early, like in the summer and early fall, and communicate with them regularly with updates. Set up contracts with the restaurants and other commercial customers if you are picking enough to warrant that. The other way that isn't too bad is selling at farmers markets directly. I know they want mushroom vendors, just as much or more than farmers. Having a Facebook or other social media presence is a good idea too. The customers love seeing pics of you picking, processing, or at the markets. These things go in waves too, so, if it wasn't really booming recently, it will certainly pick up again, though not to the heights it once was. I've discovered how great a gift dried mushrooms can be to family and friends who are cooks (and totally unappreciated by the non-cooks! haha). Full buckets to you and everyone else this year! I know with this rain, something delicious will be popping up here and there in a few days.


User_Name: Dreads
Date: Sunday July 26, 2015
Time: 06:44 PM

Messages

Nobodys been saying much about the domestic demand for matsi's. I pick and sell them to certain customers who make fabulous dishes and appreciate them. Although it's not a source of real income I do make a little money by undercutting the big companies price just a tad...


User_Name: Roger that
Date: Sunday July 26, 2015
Time: 05:50 PM

Messages

I hate to say it but Pete is right. Years ago you might have come out good picking mushrooms. No more. You would be lucky to match minimum wage these days. A job at taco bell pays better and it's clean indoor work and guaranteed money. Don't fall for the "story" by shills for the mushroom companies and tall tales from old dudes.


User_Name: shroomkid
Date: Saturday July 25, 2015
Time: 11:06 PM

Messages

Hi Ali, and everyone else in BC looking for buyers or contracts, try contacting Eric at Untamed Feast. Just a thought. Full buckets this season! I think it'll be a little like last year's on the south island: an early mini-pop, and then a later one, after the early ones have rotted off. Good luck!


User_Name: Pete
Date: Saturday July 25, 2015
Time: 01:50 PM

Messages

Hey glitter bomber - it wont be as bad this fall as it was in 2012 for most mushrooms, I don't think. That was a real bad year. This fall will be very tough no doubt and only those with other more stable income should fool around picking mushrooms commercially in my opinion. If your being led down a garden path by somebody living in a mushroom dream or fantasy world you need to wake up. Be very careful of those would encourage you to drop whatever else your doing to chase after mushrooms. Most who try to make money picking this fall will be lucky to break even. But if you like working your ass off long hrs for no money then go for it!


User_Name: Studly doowright
Date: Saturday July 25, 2015
Time: 01:05 PM

Messages

I too need a buyer in that same general area! im not finding any mushrooms of any kind right now though but expect to eventually if the weather cooperates


User_Name: youthfullhippies
Date: Friday July 24, 2015
Time: 07:21 PM

Messages

Hello everyone!! I am currently in Terrace BC, wondering if anyone knows where any buyers are around the area, or in and around cranberry junction. Or if anyone has any information where abouts they are starting to pop. Looking to hit lobsters and chantys. Can be emailed at brock_wallace@live.ca Thanks everyone!


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Thursday July 23, 2015
Time: 02:09 PM

Messages

For those interested, Forest Organics has an add about half way down on the Buy or Sell Mushroom page. Link to that page on right. Matsiman


User_Name: forest68
Date: Thursday July 23, 2015
Time: 11:19 AM

Messages

Plastic Eating Mushroom (Pestalotiopsis microspore) Tissue Culture for Bioremediation of Polyurethane I found a site that has this rare fungus that eats plastic. Also it has MANY medicinal implications and produces very powerful chemo-therapy chemicals (Taxol) among other implications. It is extremely robust and antibiotic and antifungal. We use polyurethane to make just about everything, garden hoses, furniture, water bottles etc. It's easy to produce, durable, and dirt cheap. What it isn't is recyclable there isn't a single natural process that breaks it down. That is until a newly-discovered Amazonian fungus takes a bite. Pestalotiopsis microspore is a resident of the Ecuadorian rainforest and was discovered by a group of student researchers led by molecular biochemistry professor Scott Strobel as part of Yale's annual Rainforest Expedition and Laboratory. It's the first fungus species to be able to survive exclusively on polyurethane and, more importantly, able to do so in anaerobic conditions(no oxygen) the same conditions found in the bottom of landfills. This makes the fungus a prime candidate for bioremediation projects that could finally provide an alternative to just burying the plastic and hoping for the best. Forest Organics is exited to have obtained this incredible hard to get species, and now can offer this to our customers. This mushroom comes in a petri dish, or Culture Slant


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Wednesday July 22, 2015
Time: 11:31 PM

Messages

Glitter Bomber, I'm not much of a chanty hunter, but I do hunt a little every year. In dry years what I find is in the bottom of creek less draws with plenty of trees to protect from drying. Never found commercial amounts, but plenty to eat. Since I don't eat mushrooms I give them to those who do.
 
I am originally from Louisiana and have picked  black trumpets there in the hardwoods.
 
Matsiman

User_Name: Glitter Bomber
Date: Wednesday July 22, 2015
Time: 09:34 PM

Messages

wow there's chanty's in s louisana? who knew? i thought there were only gators and carp down there! hey dudes we need some help finding mushrooms this fall since we have never done well in a drought before. 2012 was the worst and we're afraid we'll have a repeat of that. so any help from you old dudes as far as how to find chanty's etc in a dry year would help!


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Wednesday July 22, 2015
Time: 04:57 PM

Messages

Marsh Dog, thanks for the info, but you forgot to post the link to the video. Matsiman


User_Name: Marsh Dog
Date: Wednesday July 22, 2015
Time: 03:33 PM

Messages

(The life form formerly known as "Shroomer for Life") In the Ukraine, the mushroom business is much tougher then here! Our oligarchs (KC, Matt, etc.) are much kinder and gentler by comparison... July 22, 2015 A shoot-out in Volhynia Translated from Polish by J.Hawk A potentially very dangerous confrontation played out in front of the Flora agribusiness which is in the wild mushroom business. According to the local media, in 2013 it was forcibly taken over by a local shady "businessman" Vyacheslav Polyakov who simply entered the business in the company of rifle-armed thugs and declared himself the director. The case went to court which was slow to take it up, and in the meantime Polyakov did whatever he wanted. On July 19 the legal co-owners sent their own armed militants from Lutsk to retake the business. Even though it was intercepted on the way by the police and Border Guards, someone opened fire on Flora vehicles. By then Polyakov managed to assemble his own security team consisting of men armed with rifles and metal bars who are seen in the video below wearing red armbands. At some point a new confrontation broke out during which shots were fired. The police was not able to control the situation. The regional MVD has still not been able to identify the victims or the perpetrators of the shooting. A press conference with the participation of police, SBU, and MVD is to take place tomorrow.


User_Name: Forest68
Date: Wednesday July 22, 2015
Time: 02:10 PM

Messages

Hi, I'm looking for foragers in the Southern Louisiana area to harvest Chanterelles. If interested please respond to forestedibledelights@yahoo.com


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Tuesday July 21, 2015
Time: 06:10 PM

Messages

Did you not see the comments regarding the weather forecast and it's potential imapaxt on the coming fall/winter season?


User_Name: Ali
Date: Tuesday July 21, 2015
Time: 05:10 PM

Messages

Hey everyone, I'm looking into following the flush. Either pines, morels, or whatever really. I don't know too too much about picking mushrooms. I love being in the bush, and I have picked quite a bit bit... In Terrace when it was really worth it for pines. I live on Vancouver island and picked a lot of chantrelles last season, I'm looking to join someone, or a group, and really get into it this year. Can someone point me in the right direction on where to find someone who might be looking for a picking partner, or a few people looking for some extra help. I love sleeping outside and I don't mind the rain. Looking to make some money, but not afraid to work my ass off for a few months, and travel around a bit. I have a travel trailer as well as a tent, and a good bush truck. Not to mention I'm a great cook. Let me know ally_boop@hotmail.com


User_Name: Sheila
Date: Tuesday July 21, 2015
Time: 12:32 PM

Messages

Happy national junk food day everybody!!!!!


User_Name: Iron Mike
Date: Tuesday July 21, 2015
Time: 10:32 AM

Messages

Well, if the national weather service long term forecast ends up being right this time, Oct-Nov-Dec couldn't possibly look worse mushrooms wise. The area from northern Ca to northern BC is covered by a huge brown spot indicating below normal precipitation. All the rain is going down south. We will have to take what we can get and be happy about it. But you better not be depending on mushrooms for your income, especially now.


User_Name: Roger that
Date: Monday July 20, 2015
Time: 05:16 PM

Messages

Speaking of chanties etc, if the weather/drought situation continues into fall in Wa and BC they aren't going to have a commercial season for much, if anything. A rain dance might help!


User_Name: Roger that
Date: Monday July 20, 2015
Time: 05:13 PM

Messages

The harvest has been massively reduced as a result of poor weather and unstable weather and other issues previously discussed such as low prices. Sure people still pick and eat them, and some sell them but they're a niche market unlike say chanties, etc..


User_Name: ol' gulch
Date: Monday July 20, 2015
Time: 01:10 PM

Messages

I'm with you guys. Besides, I don't believe western interest in the pines is a lost cause. They did fairly well for me at markets last year. A lot of people really liked the flavor- you can do things with them that there is just no substitute for. Anybody ever had matsutake ice cream? its incredible.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Monday July 20, 2015
Time: 11:58 AM

Messages

garf, AMEN. Matsiman


User_Name: garf
Date: Monday July 20, 2015
Time: 10:44 AM

Messages

Yes the old days of mushroom madness are just not there anymore. It was fun and I really never experienced an overrun of pickers in the spots I picked ... Matter of fact I rarely saw people . I will continue to get out every fall as long as I am able to and eat all I want and give lots away and sell any excess.. there is always excess as I still have the odd 50lb plus day ...love it and it is so inspiring to hike in the fall in these beautiful mountains ..bonus is I always get a fair price. I just hope everyone enjoys it and if they work hard get some. Leave the woods as you found them ...its sometimes a place for people to find solace from this hell bent , crazy dollar hungry world we live in...


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Monday July 20, 2015
Time: 01:07 AM

Messages

Sheila; Those were the days; I loved foraging with a flashlight back in the mid 90's, it makes the matsi shrumps stand up & stand out.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Sunday July 19, 2015
Time: 08:59 PM

Messages

Roger that, Not sure if this had anything to do with permits issued, but in 97 the Forest Service was considering opening another mushroom camp. The camp limit was 3,000 and they had reached that number with 3 weeks left in the season. Matsiman


User_Name: Roger that
Date: Sunday July 19, 2015
Time: 08:42 PM

Messages

She's right about the dwindling interest too. In 2013 the chemult office of the usfs issued around 130 permits. Last year it was near 100. At the top of the mania they issued over 1000. Yes interest in picking them for money has swindled and I would expect the same holds true of most other areas that are known to produced a commercial crop. One that wouls support a lot of pressure I mean. You can find Matsutake all over the woods but usually just a few here and there. And with the bad weather/ seasons the norm for years now, You cant pick what you cant find or it's mostly wormy. I think when you find them it's better if you have a buyer yourself or eat them rather than just give them away to an export buyer for next to nothing. On the plus side the wildlife and the forest generally is much happier without all those people running around in the forests!


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Sunday July 19, 2015
Time: 06:03 PM

Messages

Sheila, Must thank you again for you sharing your knowledge. Your right on the "money".

In 95 or 97 I spent time with a production company from England. They were commissioned by National Geographic to film a story about matsi picking in Chemult.

Members of the crew wanted to film the gun battles between American and Asian pickers. According to members of the film crew, the English people had a vision of something similar to the trenches in the world wars. Americans on one side exchanging fire with Asians on the other. The crew was surprised and disappointed there was no such situation and the gun fire was Asian pickers signaling to others in their group.

I spent 2 1/2 days with the crew at the Chemult study talking about the study and picking in general. None of that footage ever aired.

Matsiman


User_Name: Sheila
Date: Sunday July 19, 2015
Time: 12:50 PM

Messages

You know a thought comes to me after reading through the recent comments. When it came to the "matsutake mania" of the 90's there was a human psychology element of that which cannot be overstated. Individuals jumped in to be pickers who saw big bucks and "got gold" fever bad but they wernet real mushroom hunters actually. People with capital to invest jumped in but they weren't real mushroom buyers, just speculators. The "big money in mushrooms" and other wild stories, most of which were bs especially the ones about gun play, robbery and druggies crawling through the woods at night with flashlights, (omg my all time favorite shock/scare tactic), were everywhere you looked. But that was long ago and nowadays, aside from a few Asian pickers and even fewer die hard old timers nobody cares anymore. Sure, some people like to eat them and chefs use them but the local/domestic mania is long over. Hell, an entire generation has gone from children to adulthood since that time!


User_Name: justdan
Date: Sunday July 19, 2015
Time: 09:23 AM

Messages

macenzie fire still productiv, still buyer there at 8$/lbs. Crop quality is fine but basket are pretty light due to low moisture content in soil. mostly blonds,greys,and wormie greens. shouldnt last for more than 2 week but who knows, we just had rain. good luck all!


User_Name: Magnumman
Date: Saturday July 18, 2015
Time: 03:45 PM

Messages

while I don't pick matsutake the long term weather forecast looks just awful for everything else, drought is not good for chanties, fall boletus, lobsters, cauliflower etc..those are the money crop and without a good harvest I'm might have a real tough winter!


User_Name: Wendywolf
Date: Saturday July 18, 2015
Time: 12:23 PM

Messages

I have about 90lbs of dried morels for sale pls email me @ wendykaskamin@hotmail.ca


User_Name: Magnum man
Date: Saturday July 18, 2015
Time: 08:21 AM

Messages

Well it stands to reason if they aren't worth it people wont pick them anymore. I picked in the 90's but when the price crashed I had to get a reliable job.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Saturday July 18, 2015
Time: 07:24 AM

Messages

Sheila, thanks for your insight into production and decline of picker population. Our studies have kept a continuous count of the number of mushrooms picked each year at the study site. Not sure if the figures represent what has happened across the Pacific Northwest, but are likely close to Chemult Crescent area. Here is a link to a chart showing what has happened at the study near Diamond Lake 1999 to 2014 in control and proper picking clusters. http://matsiman.com/umpquastudies/matsutake_mushroom_study_page_2.htm Matsiman


User_Name: Sheila
Date: Friday July 17, 2015
Time: 11:56 PM

Messages

In the last 15+ years 90 percent of the people who onced picked them aready gave up. Crazy unpredictable season and nearly value-less mushrooms at least at time s killed the US matsutake business for all but a couple companies and a few pickers..


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Friday July 17, 2015
Time: 01:40 PM

Messages

Lyle, Your are absolutely right about the effects of moisture on size and weight. We found adequate moisture or rain increases weight and size 2 to 4 times more than dry soils. These findings were published. A short version can be found at this link, http://matsiman.com/waterstudy.htm
 
However, conceder the number of mushrooms as well. Adequate rain does not make mushrooms. Rain may come at the right time in some years, yet there is no crop or a small crop.
 
There are seasons here in CJ when we get adequate rain and no commercial harvest. Only a few mushrooms here and there. Can't say we have dry seasons cause rain always starts by mid October. The average start date for matsi here is the first week in November. Rain is not an issue here.
 
Proper temperature changes are by far the greatest influence in producing matsi. To say it will be a poor matsi season because of a lack of rain is completely incorrect.
 
I'll site the 97 season in Crescent and Chemult again since it is the best season known to most pickers and the last banner season those who pick there can remember. Soils were very dry and temps in the 90's before and during the first flush. The second flush was much smaller, but we had a small amount of rain between flushes
 
Temperature changes made this crop, not rain. You can have an excellent crop without summer and fall rain, but yes if there had been adequate rain, the crop would likely have been 2 to 4 times heavier.
 
The point I have been trying to make is that a very good crop can be produced without said rains, but will not be produced without proper temperature changes.
 
Bottom line, don't give up on a matsi crop on the basis of no summer or fall rains, Rain will make that crop heavier but is not necessary to make that crop.
 
Matsiman
 

User_Name: Lyle
Date: Friday July 17, 2015
Time: 12:22 PM

Messages

One last thought on matsuyake - It's been known to some for a very long time that low moisture conditions during the growth phase prosuces a lot smaller mushrooms. It is common sense really and shouldn't be a big revelation since the same applies to fruit trees such as apples and many kinds of vegetables. So in that sense rain really does matter. Now if you pick these things and sell them you get paid by weight. In a year such as this one, if the weather service forecast were to hold accurate even somewhat, the crop would be smaller. If your a commercial mushroom harvester you want to make money, I know theres the outdoor experience element to it but the bottom line is the money. Anybody who doesn't is a rare bird indeed.


User_Name: kranberri
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 09:33 PM

Messages

Hi.has chantrelle season began on haida gwaii? Heard from the observor its a great season already.thinkin of bringing the campervan up from vancouver...anyone know?


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 04:43 PM

Messages

We have seen the price paid to the picker go down since 1995 highs when the emperors son got married. The traditionalists are dying off and the demand for matsi is dwindling more each year. The volume exported to Japan from other countries weighed into the mix makes it more difficult for our white matsutake to maintain its niche especially against the brown phallic looking variety.

The Hawaii market has traditionally been strong for matsi as well as white chanterelles. Some Scandinavian countries sell their matsi for a higher price but that may have to do with buyers and demand for their product over ours.

I surmise that the worldwide coverage of matsi stomping has affected where traditional Japanese who revere the Emperors Mushroom and its sacredness to them might wish their product to come from.

I have found it interesting to observe over the years especially being as I can no longer pick due to my stroke.


User_Name: Lyn
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 04:21 PM

Messages

Does anyone buy giant puff balls? Have an area after the rain that is just exploding......all fresh and yummy


User_Name: Picker Chick
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 02:47 PM

Messages

With or without rain whavery you think weather and temperature matters no doubt. Sudden and uneven swings from too hot to too cold makes them wormy or rotten. There there hasn't been a really good bumper season for matsutake since I was 4 years old. I'm 19 now. Sure maybe a few nomadic Asians who like to camp and stick to their own people can do this but most people cant or don't want to live like that. Having nothing and no money I mean. I eat the ones I find or just leave them for the critters. I never pick them to sell cuz thay aint worth nothing.


User_Name: Pete
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 01:30 PM

Messages

Hey man you didnt discover that about the old growth I did! Lol! You know one thing here just like a lot of other stuff peoples interest in matsutaki was because it was new to people and the money mostly. Take away the money and nobody cares is right. I like to eat them but from my point of view why anybody would bother picking and selling them seems strange considering how hard of work it can be and for little or no money you gotta wonder.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 12:47 PM

Messages

Lyle, Your right about the deaf ears for the most part. I do get private emails from those who are using the forecast model, but don't post for fear of receiving the same treatment I do.
 
I don't demand I be heard and believed. I just want those who have an open mind to conceder what I have offered and come to their own conclusions.
 
What I don't want is ridicule because they don't believe. Especially with no statically backed information for the disbelief and ridicule.
 
Matsiman

User_Name: Lyle
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 12:42 PM

Messages

One last thought ... IF and that's a big IF, the were to ever be a bumper crop of matsi's the chemult cresent are again, the buying companies would only use it as an excuse to drop the price to .25 a pound for buttons. Lol. It's happened before. No folks the matsi ship has sailed and nobody really cares outside a few interested people.


User_Name: Lyle
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 12:27 PM

Messages

It's your website dude, but you demands that your be heard and believed seem to fall on deaf ears.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 12:15 PM

Messages

Good one Lyle. Didn't see your post until after I posted my last.

 Matsiman


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 12:10 PM

Messages

Greetings All, Well it's time for the dismal forecast again because of the lack of rain. We go through this every year and I'm finished with posts suggesting lack of fall rains and dry fall weather means no season for matsi.
 
It's the same people every year saying the same thing. None of them have presented any statistical information to back their statements.
 
All of them consistently ridicule me, the documentation I have presented or make sarcastic remarks. I will no longer tolerate these types of posts.
 
If you have documented information, preferably rain fall and pound picked for multiple season, which are contrary to my findings, please present it on the board or in personal email.
 
The delete button has been serviced and ready for anticipated excessive use.
 
Sorry folks. I have no more patients for those who think the world is flat and the sun is pulled by a chariot across the sky. If you don't believe, don't discourage others, ridicule me, or get out.
 
Matsiman

User_Name: Lyle
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 11:52 AM

Messages

Omg does this ever end? Hey he discovered this she discovered that. Bla Bla Bla. For everyones information, almost 50 years ago, I DISCOVERED Matsutake grows in old growth doug fir/hemlock in clay soils with NO pumice and very little percentage of volcanic ash present so there!


User_Name: Shelia
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 10:06 AM

Messages

btw dudes, we are going into late summer and fall in an already very dry condition everywhere for mushrooms. Remember we had little or no snowpack this spring and now a very dry summer. So it isn't as if there is a bunch of water "banked" for a dry spell. Or actually we are already in pretty severe drought.


User_Name: Sheila
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 09:55 AM

Messages

So the national weather serv long term forecast is out today and it looks especially bad for wa and bc. If what they are forecasting comes true by October the below big brown spot, well below normal rainfall, will have grown to include oregon as well. Better plan on something other than mushroom picking for income this fall. Unless you inclined to think rain doesn't matter that is.


User_Name: mountainflattops
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 07:54 AM

Messages

Good discussion on Matsi, and yes I agree with matsiman they are mushrooms and mushrooms do what mushrooms do some times with no seeming sense to it all.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Thursday July 16, 2015
Time: 01:21 AM

Messages

Roger that, never said I was an expert. only said I was knowledgeable and have statistically investigated one aspect of matsi.
 
You don't have to believe, but don't make it seem I am making myself out to be something I'm freely admit I am not. I am not a self proclaimed expert or any other kind of expert. I am only trying to share solid science based information evaluated mathematically. The numbers tell the story, not me.
 
I don't mean to be rude, but I am constantly defending myself and the years I have spent collecting numbers, not what I've seen.
 
All my work has been in cooperation with the Forest Service and Oregon State University. These are not my conclusions alone.

By the way, I don't eat matsi or any other mushroom.

 
Matsiman

User_Name: Roger that
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 11:14 PM

Messages

Hey everyone is an expert in whatever mushrooms they like, just ask em! I have Asian friends, now retired, who are the walking book of knowledge regarding matsutake, but we disagree occasionally. I like morels and consider myself an expert in those. So hey live and let live. Everybodys got a point of view and many people have done their own studies, so collectively the understanding of all mushrooms is improved for sure. Mstsutake have little interest to most people outside the few who still pick them since the commercial value has collapsed but the foreigners who eat them obviously like them. Americans don't seem to want to eat them as readily as they do almost every other kind of wild mushrooms and that has hurt growth on the market. But each to his own!


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 09:44 PM

Messages

Pete, You don't need to be a scientist or even knowledgeable to participate in these discussions. Anyone has something to contribute or questions that need some kind of answer.
 
My area of knowledge and investigation is limited to matsi only and only fruit formation and growth. Our studies and publications were focused on harvest method, so I guess you could say I know a little about that also. We also are examining animal usage, but have no real conclusions yet after 21 years. On average animals eat 50% of mushrooms left. In some years it's 90%.
 
I really don't think year round rain fall is an issue for matsi in the pacific northwest. Matsi mycelia thrives in dry soils and fruiting can occur in large numbers in dry surface soils. Japanese actually removed litter to dry surface soils to promote mycelia expansion.
 
The last banner year we had here in Cave Junction, Oregon was 1992. We have had very good years since, but nothing like 92. Last year we had 3 flushes at elevations from 3,000 down to 1,200 feet. Each flush was adequately productive from a commercial aspect.
 
Matsiman

User_Name: Pete
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 08:38 PM

Messages

There is an issue long term. Months and years of way below normal rainfall eventually begins to impact the overall ecology. Global warming or whatever you want to call it may be having a more obvious impact than some want to admit. I think it's pretty obvious myself but I'm not a scientist just an old redneck mushroom guy. Was a bumper crop in chemult and other places not far away one year almost two decades ago an outlier? We haven't seen it since so I wonder? That's all I'm saying.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 06:56 PM

Messages

Pete, I don't know much about botany, but as I recall from high school, 1/3 to 1/2 a trees height is how deep it's roots go into the ground. Think about it, if trees had no moisture, they would die, leaves first, roots last.

This discussion is about summer and fall rains for mushroom production. Not year round rain.

I don't see an argument. It's a discussion

Matsiman


User_Name: Pete
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 05:46 PM

Messages

See that's what I don't get about this arguement. How did the host of the mycelium get its moisture? At some point along the way RAIN matters and the longer it goes without rain the deeper the drying of the earth and the mosture for the host plant is deprived wheather it be a bush tree whatever. . So?


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 01:24 PM

Messages

Roger that, Excellent response. I agree that all mushrooms need moisture and the source for matsi moisture is primarily from the host tree.
 
Yes, the formation of mushrooms is far to complex for any group to understand and imposable for one person. I only partially understand one aspect of one mushroom. My intension is to add this small piece to the larger puzzle.
 
However, the focus of the discussion was rain, not moisture. We went through the methods trees obtain moisture last year in detail. There were many contributors.
 
Economic importance has no bearing on conclusions derived from science investigations here. There is a small number of visitors who just want to expand their knowledge and understanding regardless of economic return. It's another reason these pages exist.
 
Thanks for your contribution.
Matsiman

User_Name: Pete
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 01:18 PM

Messages

I pretty much agree with that. Mushrooms are as close to the free market as we get nowdays. Aside from a few big players trying to take over and make monopolies that is.


User_Name: Roger that
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 12:53 PM

Messages

Moisture of some kind and from some source matters for all mushrooms. To claim otherwise defies logic and science. Of course many get their moisture from the host or primarily so, at certain times. Others like Amanita pop on a rain storm and got theirs primarily from that rain. This is a very complex issue and I don't believe it is clearly understood by anyone. Matsitake is but a small part of the commercial mushroom harvest in our greater northwest areas and rate below chanterelles in economic importance. Now if an export company or two makes a killing shipping them to japan that's great but far and away the bulk of broad benefit from the fall harvest has to do with all the other varieties. The importance of the others, domestically speaking, from those who harvest the mushrooms to the chefs who use them is profound. It's real economic activity in the real economy. Myself I don't prefer matsutake to eat or harvest over other kinds.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 09:15 AM

Messages

Rger that, best explanation of forecasting weather ever been posted here. However, conicalifornia has been more accurate than anybody's forecast I've seen for long range weather. Maybe she has a crystal ball! Her mushroom forecast has been less.
 
We go through the importance of rain for matsi every year. Almost all think rain is absolutely necessary. Why, I don't know. I guess because it's the poplar conclusion. Those who are open to other conclusions have read my statically based findings concerning necessity of rain. I also did a private investigation artificially applying water with sprinklers. My study partner and I did a similar investigation. The results of that investigation were published in a science publication reviewed by several scientists at Oregon State University.
 
I'm disappointed these findings are not read by most who post here. I am always open to statistically based information which oppose these findings. One of the purposes of these pages is to supply reliable information concerning fruit production of matsi. If you have something to add other than observation, please do so.
 
Matsiman

User_Name: Rger that
Date: Wednesday July 15, 2015
Time: 01:30 AM

Messages

Forecasting the weather is not an exact science but more a matter of likely and unlikely. I agree it don't look good but then I don't depend on mushrooms for my living so am not at the mercy of the weather. Long ago seasons were more predictable. Yes things were good a couple years in the 90's but sp were prices pickers got and for reasons not understood that hasn't happened since for matsi anyways. I think we all understand rain matters.


User_Name: Matsiman
Date: Tuesday July 14, 2015
Time: 11:15 PM

Messages

Long range forecasts for mushroom production is only a guess from my experience and point of view. I've seen huge crops of white chanties with no rain and temps in the 90's. Any body remember the west side of South Central Oregon Cascades in 98. More white chanties than I've seen since, but very few matsi. Then there is the 97 matsi season in Chemult and Crescent. Very dry, temps in 90's, and more matsi than any of the following years. We'll just have to wait and see. Mushrooms do what they want. Matsiman


User_Name: Shroomer for Life
Date: Tuesday July 14, 2015
Time: 07:53 PM

Messages

Sheila speaks sense. I myself will be spending the winter in my warm burrow. The snow pack was horrible last winter--don't you think that will affect the crop? I do--but I'm only a nutria.


User_Name: Sheila
Date: Tuesday July 14, 2015
Time: 06:38 PM

Messages

The natl weather service long term forecast could not look worse for the west coast mushroom areas including canada for this summer and fall. Below normal precipitation could be quite severe for many places that usually produce a good fall crop of all kinds of mushrooms. I don't get how somebody comes up with a 'forecast" so opposite. So until proven otherwise I will assume the weather service one is closer. Go look for yourselves if you don't believe it. Washington and Canada probably wont even have any season at all if it holds true- see that HUGE BROWN SPOT? ....(way below normal precip very likely). Oregon/California may have some kind of season but it's never a good plan to bank on a "late season". Unless you have other income or job to get you through the winter that is. . . . .


User_Name: Scruff
Date: Monday July 13, 2015
Time: 11:39 AM

Messages

Wishful thinking. Those 6 tropical cyclones upset the apple cart for a bit but dry weather and smoke into November is more likely. Will be worse than last fall unless a tropical cyclone is sent our way early. We had one close call last fall due to the early stage buildup of the el nino. Could have a split jet with not much weather. Most scenarios point to a late season. Good luck


User_Name: Pete
Date: Monday July 13, 2015
Time: 09:57 AM

Messages

That is the exact opposite of the national weather service forecast for the western us and Canada for this fall and winter so I sure hope your right!


User_Name: conicalifornia
Date: Sunday July 12, 2015
Time: 10:17 AM

Messages

Hello all, high pressure over north pacific is showing strong signs of weakening substantially in middle of July through possibly the rest of summer. The atmospheric water vapor levels, upper level wind patterns, sea surface temperatures, and equatorial sub surface rotating kelvin waves are supportive of this and moist low pressures are now lining up all the way to Siberia and is looking impressive for rains and relief from the dry conditions in Canada, Washington, and possibly Southern Oregon and Nor Cal soon. I am hypothesizing one kick ass late summer and fall for wild mushrooms along the entire north america west coast. The dry levels of soils will be interesting to observe whether it triggers larger flushes of chanterelle, lobster, matsi, after wet pattern returns. It seems in the northern latitudes the aerobic dry out of soils stimulates pen development and heightens the interaction between the mycelia and rootlets thus triggering really nice firm mushrooms when rains hit and they fruit. cheers to getting through the heat and full bucks!


User_Name: Shroomer for Life
Date: Saturday July 11, 2015
Time: 03:49 PM

Messages

Uncyclopedia picked up this picture of ME kickin' back, lightin' up a few cigs to share with my friend Mitch after a busy day of not pickin'. That's just the way this morel season has been... http://uncyclopedia.wikia.com/wiki/Nutria


User_Name: jononymous
Date: Thursday July 09, 2015
Time: 03:11 PM

Messages

Just finished up in China Nose. there really isn't much at all in that Canyon, but it's frickin beautiful as heck in there. :) We're continuing on to other mushrooms, and are now filming a mini docus-eries on our adventures and mushroom picking in general! if anyone out there has any footage on their phones or camera's that they would like to see in our series, please email me at findjonathanbaker@gmail.com You will get a credit and your picture in the credits if you would like :) It's gonna be a really popular show. thanks!


User_Name: Buckman65
Date: Thursday July 09, 2015
Time: 10:08 AM

Messages

I have fresh chicken of the woods for sale for $15 a pound in maryland. Email at - mikewheeler65@icloud.com


User_Name: michalangelo
Date: Wednesday July 08, 2015
Time: 09:06 PM

Messages

Hello, we are morel mushroom pickers (still in NWT) looking for opportunity to pick chanterelles. I would appreciate any info (where/when/...). My email: aks@centrum.sk Thank you!


User_Name: woodsman
Date: Tuesday July 07, 2015
Time: 04:17 AM

Messages

Does anyone know if there are any burns in Oregon that are still producing


User_Name: jononymous
Date: Sunday July 05, 2015
Time: 09:30 PM

Messages

We just left Chelaslie, along with most everyone else and the buyers. We heard a rumour that China Nose just started to pop. any more info on China Nose? we might drive over there and see for ourselves. how's NWT doing? did it fail this year?


User_Name: Falon
Date: Sunday July 05, 2015
Time: 01:08 PM

Messages

So I've just left the Mackenzie fire (200km down logging road from Mackenzie) because things were slowing down and enough pickers left to not be worth it for buyers to hang around either. But I still want to keep picking Morels somewhere until end of July hopefully... I've been told that high altitude down south in the Kootenays is still going, can any buyers on any fires still in BC please call/message me so I can come pick for you until the end of the month? 780-222-3489


User_Name: David
Date: Friday July 03, 2015
Time: 11:01 AM

Messages

Dose anyone have info on toress Fire please. I'm at China knows fire and is almost dead here .another day or two I am thinking. Although the hot spots are almost gone there r people still picking 2-3 buckets a day. I have been doing 5-6 buckets a day and can't settle for under three. The info would be great please and thankyou


User_Name: Nicole
Date: Thursday July 02, 2015
Time: 02:54 PM

Messages

Just wondering if anyone knows if there is still good picking in tumbler ridge


User_Name: mushroomstruan
Date: Thursday July 02, 2015
Time: 09:18 AM

Messages

HI, I would like to pick chantrelles etc on Vancouver island this fall/winter. I'm looking to talk to buyer/s about what, where and for how much. Please contact me at mushroomstruan@hotmail.com .


User_Name: ntmorels
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 09:33 PM

Messages

Austin is giving you good advice about NWT...too hot, too dry, too many bulldog flies and blackflies and new fires closing roads everywhere with heavy smoke. When we pulled out of our burn a few days ago we could not see the banks of the river we were travelling on for more than 15 miles due to smoke.


User_Name: Merry_nomads
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 07:15 PM

Messages

And is there any good morel picking left?


User_Name: Merry_nomads
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 07:11 PM

Messages

When does the porcini season usually start?


User_Name: MushroomWife28
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 06:41 PM

Messages

Okay thanks for the info! :)


User_Name: Austin
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 06:35 PM

Messages

Don't go to NWT. It is on fire. Roads closed on and off. No rain. Future desert. The NWT gov't sure made a bad call by saying that it was to be the biggest morel harvest the world has ever seen. Mother Nature wins again as always!!


User_Name: MushroomWife28
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 02:28 PM

Messages

Hello Everyone! My son and husband have been picking in the Cheslatta and China Nose Fires out of Burns Lk BC and have been doing okay, making about $700/week...wondering if anyone thinks its worth it for our family to head up to NWT for picking? Were about 17 hrs from there but have a family and don't want to waste time or money if it's not worth it...okay thank you!! :)


User_Name: Lobo
Date: Wednesday July 01, 2015
Time: 12:22 AM

Messages

Lonnie; ... it's been 110 in Yakima but August was getting large huckleberries and fall mushrooms in June and it is too early for them, he is predicting a possible early autumn.


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